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Ethnic Bias in Judicial Decision Making: Evidence from Criminal Appeals in Kenya
Ethnic Bias in Judicial Decision Making: Evidence from Criminal Appeals in Kenya

Abstract Understanding sources of judicial bias is essential for establishing due process. To date, theories of judicial decision making are rooted in ranked societies with majority–minority group cleavages, leaving unanswered which groups are [...]

License: CC BY-NC-ND
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/S000305542100143X
Type: Journal Articles
Education or Indoctrination? The Violent Origins of Public School Systems in an Era of State-Building
Education or Indoctrination? The Violent Origins of Public School Systems in an Era of State-Building

Abstract Why do modern states regulate and provide mass education? This article proposes a theory of education as a state-building tool that is deployed when mass violence threatens the state’s viability. Experiencing mass violence can heighte [...]

License: CC BY-NC-ND
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/S0003055422000247
Type: Journal Articles
Ascriptive Characteristics and Perceptions of Impropriety in the Rule of Law: Race, Gender, and Public Assessments of Whether Judges Can Be Impartial
Ascriptive Characteristics and Perceptions of Impropriety in the Rule of Law: Race, Gender, and Public Assessments of Whether Judges Can Be Impartial

Abstract Perceptions of procedural fairness influence the legitimacy of the law and because procedures are mutable, reforming them can buttress support for the rule of law. Yet legal authorities have recently faced a distinct challenge: accusa [...]

License: CC BY-NC-ND
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/ajps.12599
Type: Journal Articles
The Effect of Gender on Interruptions at Congressional Hearings
The Effect of Gender on Interruptions at Congressional Hearings

Abstract Women in Congress are highly effective legislators. Yet, if women are more likely than men to be interrupted during committee work, they may face a gender-related impediment. We examine speech patterns during more than 24,000 congress [...]

License: CC BY-NC-ND
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/S0003055422000260
Type: Journal Articles
‘How Much Politics Is There’? Exploring Students’ Experiences of Values and Impartiality from an Epistemic Perspective
‘How Much Politics Is There’? Exploring Students’ Experiences of Values and Impartiality from an Epistemic Perspective

In this article, we report findings of students’ conceptions of values and impartiality in political science teaching in relation to research on epistemic beliefs. This field of research concerns students’ beliefs about the nature of knowledge [...]

License: CC BY-NC-ND
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15512169.2020.1730863
Type: Journal Articles
Calling Brussels: An Innovative Teaching Project
Calling Brussels: An Innovative Teaching Project

This innovative teaching project brought students and professionals working at or with the European Union (EU) together via video-conferencing. The idea was that by having students talk to policymakers this would add to their understanding of [...]

License: CC BY-NC-ND
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15512169.2019.1702883
Type: Journal Articles
Adapting a Governmental Training Platform to Simulate Peace Operations in the Classroom
Adapting a Governmental Training Platform to Simulate Peace Operations in the Classroom

Scholars have developed original pedagogical approaches to impart the knowledge and skills required for professional life in the area of peace and development. Experience-based learning, simulations, games, and role-plays have been used with p [...]

License: CC BY-NC-ND
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15512169.2019.1621180
Type: Journal Articles
To Emerge? Breadwinning, Motherhood, and Women’s Decisions to Run for Office
To Emerge? Breadwinning, Motherhood, and Women’s Decisions to Run for Office

Abstract: Women’s underrepresentation in American politics is often attributed to relatively low levels of political ambition. Yet scholarship still grapples with a major leak in the pipeline to power: that many qualified and politically ambit [...]

License: CC BY-NC-ND
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/S0003055420000970
Type: Journal Articles
The adoption of youth quotas after the Arab uprisings
The adoption of youth quotas after the Arab uprisings

Abstract: The adoption of electoral quotas for politically under-represented groups has become a prominent policy worldwide. An increasing number of states have adopted youth quotas, which aim to foster the election of young members of parliam [...]

License: CC BY-NC-ND
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/21565503.2018.1528163
Type: Journal Articles
Race, class, or both? Responses to candidate characteristics in Canada, the UK, and the US
Race, class, or both? Responses to candidate characteristics in Canada, the UK, and the US

Abstract: Research suggests that voters use identity markers to infer information about candidates for office. Yet politicians have various markers that often point in conflicting directions, and it is unclear how citizens respond to competing [...]

License: CC BY-NC-ND
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/21565503.2019.1636833
Type: Journal Articles
Toward a Comparative Measure of Climate Policy Output
Toward a Comparative Measure of Climate Policy Output

Abstract: Comparative policy studies face a number of methodological challenges where conceptualization of the object of comparison—policy output—is the most fundamental. On the basis of three common approaches of the study of policy outpu [...]

License: CC BY-NC-ND
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/psj.12095
Type: Journal Articles
Tracing Process to Performance of Collaborative Governance: A Comparative Case Study of Federal Hydropower Licensing
Tracing Process to Performance of Collaborative Governance: A Comparative Case Study of Federal Hydropower Licensing

Abstract: Despite collaborative governance's popularity, whether collaboration improves policy performance remains uncertain. This study assesses the link between collaborative decision making and licensed environmental management protocols in [...]

License: CC BY-NC-ND
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/psj.12096
Type: Journal Articles
A Research Agenda for the Study of Policy Entrepreneurs
A Research Agenda for the Study of Policy Entrepreneurs

Abstract: The study of policy entrepreneurs as agents of change has developed greatly in recent years, supported by increasingly more sophisticated theoretical and empirical research. In this article, we first consider how the concept of the p [...]

License: CC BY-NC-ND
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/psj.12405
Type: Journal Articles
Behavioral Consequences of Open Candidate Recruitment
Behavioral Consequences of Open Candidate Recruitment

Abstract: Candidate-selection methods (CSM) crucially affect the behavior of Members of Parliament (MPs). Extant research investigates the consequentiality of the selectorate, but is neglecting the candidacy dimension of CSM. But what are the [...]

License: CC BY-NC-ND
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/lsq.12283
Type: Journal Articles
Coalition Prospects and Policy Change: An Application to the Environment
Coalition Prospects and Policy Change: An Application to the Environment

Abstract: In most developed democracies, parties adjust their positions to polls and public opinion. Yet, in a coalition government, the policy that emerges is often the outcome of negotiations between governing parties. We argue that the cred [...]

License: CC BY-NC-ND
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/lsq.12273
Type: Journal Articles
Disputed Policy Change: The Role of Events, Policy Learning, and Negotiated Agreements
Disputed Policy Change: The Role of Events, Policy Learning, and Negotiated Agreements

Abstract: This paper explores policy change in Swedish coastal and marine conservation, identifying advocacy coalition factors—focusing internal and external events, policy learning, and negotiated agreements—that explain divergent outcome [...]

License: CC BY-NC-ND
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/psj.12411
Type: Journal Articles
Political Dynasties in the UK House of Commons: The Null Effect of Narrow Electoral Selection
Political Dynasties in the UK House of Commons: The Null Effect of Narrow Electoral Selection

Abstract: Does power persist within families? This article considers whether members of the UK House of Commons with longer legislative careers after 1832 were more likely to establish a political dynasty. Tenure can create opportunities to pr [...]

License: CC BY-NC-ND
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/lsq.12164
Type: Journal Articles
The Growth of the Evaluation Tree in the Policy Analysis Forest: Recent Developments in Evaluation
The Growth of the Evaluation Tree in the Policy Analysis Forest: Recent Developments in Evaluation

Abstract: The practice and profession of evaluation is continually evolving. From its early origin in the Great Society years of the 1960s, through its golden years of the 1970s, its transformation under the fiscal conservatism of the Reagan e [...]

License: CC BY-NC-ND
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/psj.12387
Type: Journal Articles
(Under What Conditions) Do Politicians Reward Their Supporters? Evidence from Kenya’s Constituencies Development Fund
(Under What Conditions) Do Politicians Reward Their Supporters? Evidence from Kenya’s Constituencies Development Fund

Abstract: We leverage innovative spatial modeling techniques and data on the precise geo-locations of more than 32,000 Constituency Development Fund (CDF) projects in Kenya to test whether Members of Parliament (MPs) reward their supporters. W [...]

License: CC BY-NC-ND
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/S0003055418000709
Type: Journal Articles
Does Exposure to the Refugee Crisis Make Natives More Hostile?
Does Exposure to the Refugee Crisis Make Natives More Hostile?

Abstract: Although Europe has experienced unprecedented numbers of refugee arrivals in recent years, there exists almost no causal evidence regarding the impact of the refugee crisis on natives’ attitudes, policy preferences, and political eng [...]

License: CC BY-NC-ND
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/S0003055418000813
Type: Journal Articles
Family Matters: How Immigrant Histories Can Promote Inclusion
Family Matters: How Immigrant Histories Can Promote Inclusion

Abstract: Immigration is a highly polarized issue in the United States, and negative attitudes toward immigrants are common. Yet, almost all Americans are descended from people who originated outside the country, a narrative often evoked by th [...]

License: CC BY-NC-ND
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/S0003055420001057
Type: Journal Articles
Fundraising for Stigmatized Groups: A Text Message Donation Experiment
Fundraising for Stigmatized Groups: A Text Message Donation Experiment

Abstract: As government welfare programming contracts and NGOs increasingly assume core aid functions, they must address a long-standing challenge—that people in need often belong to stigmatized groups. To study other-regarding behavior, we fi [...]

License: CC BY-NC-ND
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/S0003055420000787
Type: Journal Articles
Paths towards Coalition Defection: Democracies and Withdrawal from the Iraq War
Paths towards Coalition Defection: Democracies and Withdrawal from the Iraq War

Abstract: Despite widespread public opposition to the Iraq War, numerous democracies joined the US-led multinational force. However, while some stayed until the end of coalition operations, and several increased their deployments over time, ot [...]

License: CC BY-NC-ND
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/eis.2019.10
Type: Journal Articles
The Non-Democratic Roots of Mass Education: Evidence from 200 Years
The Non-Democratic Roots of Mass Education: Evidence from 200 Years

Abstract: Because primary education is often conceptualized as a pro-poor redistributive policy, a common argument is that democratization increases its provision. But primary education can also serve the goals of autocrats, including redistri [...]

License: CC BY-NC-ND
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/S0003055420000647
Type: Journal Articles